Geovation Water Challenge


How can we better manage water use in Britain, sustainably?

This Challenge is now closed. The challenge ran from 1 December 2015 to 27 January 2016 (12noon). The winners of this challenge were:

Refillable Cities
Sustainable Catchments (Natural Flood Mitigation)
Fix our water

Geovation Camp was held at Ordnance Survey, Southampton 4-6 March.

The best ideas won support to research, develop and launch their product or service

The problems were grouped into 5 main themes:

Theme 1: Too little water
Theme 2: Too much water
Theme 3: Poor water quality
Theme 4: Ageing water infrastructure
Theme 5: Water use behaviour

The best ideas were invited into 12 month funded Geovation Programme to include financial, developer, and business support.

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@simon03)

Landstory.io

Landstory.io is a digital platform and physical network to facilitate co-operation and collaboration between the public, private and community sectors. The platform will map and build a picture of the human and physical landscape to enable the implementation of social, ecological and financially beneficial landscape interventions. Our vision is of a highly skilled and motivated young workforce who can design, plan and ...more »

Voting

30 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@michellewalker)

A Universal Translator for Water Project Information Sharing

A 'Universal Translator' tool to enable proposed and current catchment management and water management project information to be shared seamlessly between all partners in the Catchment Based Approach. Users only need to enter their data in one place to update all existing water project databases and publish OpenData layers for re-use in other systems. This will enable better networking between the wide range of partners ...more »

Voting

5 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@iandee)

Tree Health as a Water Quality Indicator

Analyse and monitor the health of trees in riparian, estuarine and coastal areas as a method of identifying poor water quality. The health of trees near water sources can be directly influenced by the quality of that water. Understanding and monitoring the health of these trees could provide insight into where water quality is an issue, and help identify an patterns in quality improvement/reduction.

Voting

4 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@mhaft0)

Missed connections identification app and tool

The use of optical brighteners has been previously established as a low cost way to diagnose missed connections. Use of UV light to identify the presence of these optical brighteners in watercourses in combination with a mobile device and mapping application and GIS data can help locate missed connections and remedy them. Using a simple UV filter attachment for a smart phone and citizen-science volunteers, indicator signals ...more »

Voting

4 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@matthew.e.thomas)

Poo Mapping

In storms sewage can overflow into rivers or lakes. However, if there are blockages, miss connections or the water levels are too high then sewage can over flow all the time. This sewage becomes an environmental hazard. The idea is to use water proof RFID (Radio Freq Identifier) tags that are flushed down toilets/drains to help map route of sewage. If tags re-appear at exists into rivers or sea outlet when there are no ...more »

Voting

3 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@philip)

Green Shield

The media has encouraged a public perception that flood defences need to involve dredging, large-scale engineering and hard-defences. Adopting a catchment-based approach, identifying potential areas wherein soft defences could be effective, and valuing the flood mitigation benefits of engineered landscapes (in addition to their amenity value) would change public perception and encourage landowner participation. Greenshield ...more »

Voting

2 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Interactive sandbox and projection mapping for flood management

To create an interactive playbox which mixes layers of physical data with visual animation and feedback. The real-life sand in the box can be played with and the data is fed into the computer. The software processes parameters such as the height of the sand and hand motions made by the users; and then projects back onto the sand visual geographical information, including elevation, contour lines, rainfall and water flow ...more »

Voting

2 votes

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@dragontail.co.uk)

Using Lidar for flood analysis

Extensive flooding has hit the headlines recently, affecting area that were previously seen as safe. The likely cause is the continued rise in global temperatures, resulting in the possibility of further extreme weather patterns. In the past the solution has been to use risk analysis to predict potential floods and provide flood defenses in vulnerable areas based on probability of severity. However with the continued ...more »

Voting

1 vote

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@alison.carruthers)

Understanding your water world

Water is an essential resource but we constantly battle against too much, too little or poor quality water. Professional understanding water and the water cycle is important but bringing this understanding to everyone of all ages will help us to appreciate and manage our water resources sustainably now and in the future. Our aim is to provide an online hub for schools, clubs and organisations to download useful information ...more »

Voting

1 vote

Geovation Water Challenge

Submitted by (@fiona.thomas)

Mapping Plastic Flotsam and Jetsam

Develop an app to allow citizen scientists and beachcombers to record instances of plastics being washed up on-shore, and place them on a map.

 

People are already forming Facebook groups for their local area to share finds and ask for help in identifying objects being washed up. Adding a spatial element, and allowing the data to be downloaded, would allow a more detailed picture of the problem to emerge.

Voting

0 votes